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File: [cvs.NetBSD.org] / src / lib / libc / arch / arm / softfloat / arm-gcc.h (download)

Revision 1.3, Sat Dec 24 21:11:16 2005 UTC (16 years, 4 months ago) by perry
Branch: MAIN
CVS Tags: yamt-pf42-baseX, yamt-pf42-base4, yamt-pf42-base3, yamt-pf42-base2, yamt-pf42-base, yamt-pf42, yamt-pagecache-tag8, yamt-pagecache-base8, yamt-pagecache-base7, yamt-pagecache-base6, yamt-pagecache-base5, yamt-pagecache-base4, yamt-pagecache-base3, yamt-pagecache-base2, yamt-pagecache-base, wrstuden-revivesa-base-3, wrstuden-revivesa-base-2, wrstuden-revivesa-base-1, wrstuden-revivesa-base, wrstuden-revivesa, wrstuden-fixsa-newbase, wrstuden-fixsa-base-1, wrstuden-fixsa-base, wrstuden-fixsa, netbsd-6-base, netbsd-6-1-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1-RC4, netbsd-6-1-RC3, netbsd-6-1-RC2, netbsd-6-1-RC1, netbsd-6-1-5-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1-4-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1-3-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1-2-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1-1-RELEASE, netbsd-6-1, netbsd-6-0-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-RC2, netbsd-6-0-RC1, netbsd-6-0-6-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-5-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-4-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-3-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-2-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0-1-RELEASE, netbsd-6-0, netbsd-6, netbsd-5-base, netbsd-5-2-RELEASE, netbsd-5-2-RC1, netbsd-5-2-3-RELEASE, netbsd-5-2-2-RELEASE, netbsd-5-2-1-RELEASE, netbsd-5-2, netbsd-5-1-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1-RC4, netbsd-5-1-RC3, netbsd-5-1-RC2, netbsd-5-1-RC1, netbsd-5-1-5-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1-4-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1-3-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1-2-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1-1-RELEASE, netbsd-5-1, netbsd-5-0-RELEASE, netbsd-5-0-RC4, netbsd-5-0-RC3, netbsd-5-0-RC2, netbsd-5-0-RC1, netbsd-5-0-2-RELEASE, netbsd-5-0-1-RELEASE, netbsd-5-0, netbsd-5, netbsd-4-base, netbsd-4-0-RELEASE, netbsd-4-0-RC5, netbsd-4-0-RC4, netbsd-4-0-RC3, netbsd-4-0-RC2, netbsd-4-0-RC1, netbsd-4-0-1-RELEASE, netbsd-4-0, netbsd-4, mjf-devfs2-base, mjf-devfs2, matt-premerge-20091211, matt-nb6-plus-nbase, matt-nb6-plus-base, matt-nb6-plus, matt-nb5-pq3-base, matt-nb5-pq3, matt-nb5-mips64-u2-k2-k4-k7-k8-k9, matt-nb5-mips64-u1-k1-k5, matt-nb5-mips64-premerge-20101231, matt-nb5-mips64-premerge-20091211, matt-nb5-mips64-k15, matt-nb5-mips64, matt-nb4-mips64-k7-u2a-k9b, matt-mips64-premerge-20101231, matt-mips64-base2, matt-mips64-base, matt-mips64, matt-armv6-prevmlocking, matt-armv6-nbase, matt-armv6-base, matt-armv6, keiichi-mipv6-base, keiichi-mipv6, jym-xensuspend-nbase, jym-xensuspend-base, jym-xensuspend, hpcarm-cleanup-nbase, hpcarm-cleanup-base, hpcarm-cleanup, cube-autoconf-base, cube-autoconf, christos-time_t-nbase, christos-time_t-base, christos-time_t, cherry-xenmp-base, cherry-xenmp, bouyer-quota2-nbase, bouyer-quota2-base, bouyer-quota2, abandoned-netbsd-4-base, abandoned-netbsd-4
Branch point for: yamt-pagecache, tls-maxphys
Changes since 1.2: +2 -2 lines

Remove leading __ from __(const|inline|signed|volatile) -- it is obsolete.

/* $NetBSD: arm-gcc.h,v 1.3 2005/12/24 21:11:16 perry Exp $ */

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
One of the macros `BIGENDIAN' or `LITTLEENDIAN' must be defined.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
#ifdef __ARMEB__
#define BIGENDIAN
#else
#define LITTLEENDIAN
#endif

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The macro `BITS64' can be defined to indicate that 64-bit integer types are
supported by the compiler.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
#define BITS64

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Each of the following `typedef's defines the most convenient type that holds
integers of at least as many bits as specified.  For example, `uint8' should
be the most convenient type that can hold unsigned integers of as many as
8 bits.  The `flag' type must be able to hold either a 0 or 1.  For most
implementations of C, `flag', `uint8', and `int8' should all be `typedef'ed
to the same as `int'.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
typedef int flag;
typedef int uint8;
typedef int int8;
typedef int uint16;
typedef int int16;
typedef unsigned int uint32;
typedef signed int int32;
#ifdef BITS64
typedef unsigned long long int uint64;
typedef signed long long int int64;
#endif

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Each of the following `typedef's defines a type that holds integers
of _exactly_ the number of bits specified.  For instance, for most
implementation of C, `bits16' and `sbits16' should be `typedef'ed to
`unsigned short int' and `signed short int' (or `short int'), respectively.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
typedef unsigned char bits8;
typedef signed char sbits8;
typedef unsigned short int bits16;
typedef signed short int sbits16;
typedef unsigned int bits32;
typedef signed int sbits32;
#ifdef BITS64
typedef unsigned long long int bits64;
typedef signed long long int sbits64;
#endif

#ifdef BITS64
/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The `LIT64' macro takes as its argument a textual integer literal and
if necessary ``marks'' the literal as having a 64-bit integer type.
For example, the GNU C Compiler (`gcc') requires that 64-bit literals be
appended with the letters `LL' standing for `long long', which is `gcc's
name for the 64-bit integer type.  Some compilers may allow `LIT64' to be
defined as the identity macro:  `#define LIT64( a ) a'.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
#define LIT64( a ) a##LL
#endif

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The macro `INLINE' can be used before functions that should be inlined.  If
a compiler does not support explicit inlining, this macro should be defined
to be `static'.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
#define INLINE static inline

/*
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The ARM FPA is odd in that it stores doubles high-order word first, no matter
what the endianness of the CPU.  VFP is sane.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
#if defined(SOFTFLOAT_FOR_GCC)
#if defined(__VFP_FP__) || defined(__ARMEB__)
#define FLOAT64_DEMANGLE(a)	(a)
#define FLOAT64_MANGLE(a)	(a)
#else
#define FLOAT64_DEMANGLE(a)	(((a) << 32) | ((a) >> 32))
#define FLOAT64_MANGLE(a)	FLOAT64_DEMANGLE(a)
#endif
#endif