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Revision 1.3, Tue Dec 31 11:03:12 2013 UTC (8 months ago) by wiz
Branch: MAIN
CVS Tags: pkgsrc-2014Q2-base, pkgsrc-2014Q2, pkgsrc-2014Q1-base, pkgsrc-2014Q1, HEAD
Changes since 1.2: +1 -1 lines

Update to 0.25:

This release includes a veritable ton of work, but the biggest change
is probably the addition of real (YMMV) metadata support, including
hardlinks, and the ability to directly save/restore trees without tar
and split/join.  See bup-index(1), bup-save(1), bup-restore(1),
bup-meta(1), bup-xstat(1), and the updated "Using bup" section in the
README.

Note though, that the metadata support really is our first pass, and
there are already things that we know need fixing (i.e. better support
for cross-filesystem-type save/restore (too noisy), etc.).  And check
the "Notes on ..." sections in the README for some platform-specific
limitations.

An incomplete list of other notable changes since 0.24b:

  - bup will no longer create ~/.bup implicitly; "bup init" is
    required.

  - "bup split" now supports a compression-level option (-#).

  - "bup tag" now supports "-f".

  - "bup ls" now supports "-a", "-s", "--human-readable", etc., and
     reports more information.

  - "bup web" now supports "--human-readable".

  - "bup import-rdiff-backup" has been added.

  - "bup cat-file" has been added.

  - The default "/usr" installation prefix can be overridden via PREFIX.

  - Python 2.4 is no longer supported.

And we have at least one (likely minor) known issue:

  - *Very* large (i.e. probably greater than MAX_LONG), or negative
    filesystem timestamps may not always be handled correctly at the
    moment.  We'll fix that soon.  And related -- some of the tests
    may fail on FUSE filesystems.

bup is a program that backs things up.  bup has a few advantages over other
backup software:

It uses a rolling checksum algorithm (similar to rsync) to split large files
into chunks. The most useful result of this is you can backup huge virtual
machine (VM) disk images, databases, and XML files incrementally, even though
they're typically all in one huge file, and not use tons of disk space for
multiple versions.

It uses the packfile format from git (the open source version control system),
so you can access the stored data even if you don't like bup's user interface.

Unlike git, it writes packfiles directly (instead of having a separate garbage
collection/repacking stage) so it's fast even with gratuitously huge amounts of
data. bup's improved index formats also allow you to track far more filenames
than git (millions) and keep track of far more objects (hundreds or thousands of
gigabytes).

Data is "automagically" shared between incremental backups without having to
know which backup is based on which other one - even if the backups are made
from two different computers that don't even know about each other. You just
tell bup to back stuff up, and it saves only the minimum amount of data needed.